What is your Community?

What is your Community?

In order for the Committee to investigate and recommend ways of increasing Community Wellbeing, we need to know what community means to you? What communities are you part of? Is it your stair, street, estate, village, town or something else – like friends, or family? What types of community should the Committee look into as part of their future work into community wellbeing? Join the conversation below or add your own idea by clicking the orange light bulb button on the bottom right of the page!

Points

Community is everything - look at Italian society. People eat together, laugh together and have fun together regardless of age or status. It doesn't need to be geographical - a shared interest is enough (Bowling clubs are great at this) - but we need to work at making people feel welcome. Walking into a crowded room of strangers is hard at anytime but becomes almost impossible if you are suffering from poor mental health or addiction. More effort needs to be made re inclusion.

Our community is made up of isles, rural areas, towns, crofts and farms, isolated houses. Community means to us: Where we live and work, social communities, communities of interest, whole of Shetland, geographical communities. Not all people feel part of a community. Many people feel isolated.

YMCA Edinburgh. Women's group think we should work together to look after local areas like parks and gardens, that we should listen to all voices on important issues. 'My neighbour cuts my grass and I do his flowerbeds'. Social isolation of single and elderly people.

YMCA Women's group said that community means: support & groups like the YMCA, drama & parents groups; allotments; clubs; Scotland; church; neighbours; friends, international neighbours; library, community spaces; good transport; shops and shop keepers being friendly Community means respecting & helping each; learning to support people with a disability; visiting friends; mental health awareness for all; buying local; love; supporting each other; listening; feeling like you belong; caring.

Places: Support systems regardless of age, ethnicity, sex and religion. A place to meet. Meeting place to discuss common issues/problems. North Glasgow community centres and organisations. Shop. Café. School. Church. Library. Sport. Gala days. Social club. Work. Community groups. Food banks. Outdoor/green garden space. Kids group. Schools. Funding. Safety. Fun. Leisure. Play. Heritage. Stories. Experience.

People: Full spectrum of individuals living in an area. Family, friends. Neighbours. Volunteers. Scotland. Villages. People coming together to celebrate life and share concerns. Care for all the people who call north of Glasgow home. Support and connection. Well-being and awareness. Health. Meeting and supporting people with mental illnesses and addiction. Provision of services & support to affect social change-meeting needs. Looking out for each other. Networking. The people make the community

At Dumbiedykes Funday local people many of whom were young children, said that community meant to them; friends, family and school, the community centre, good neighbours and friendliness. See the photos attached. People said the area needs more local services, shops, transport, community space, and support for children and families, childcare and activities. Communication about what is available. Better housing provision and opportunities and consideration of the impact of students.

Our community is like our family with whom we share our joy and happiness.

Our community is geographic, but has topic focused communities within it.

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